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Canned boiled peanuts are great way to enjoy the best boiled peanuts any time of year! In this recipe cooked green peanuts are transformed into a salty and sometimes spicy southern treat.

boiled peanuts in shell and opened next to salt

If you are from the south, you know that the summer months bring out all the boiled peanut stands, selling warm salty goodness in a brown paper bag. You can’t drive down the highway without running into roadside stands offering up fresh boiled peanuts.

You need raw, green peanuts to make hot-boiled peanuts. It simply doesn’t work with roasted peanuts. However, green peanuts are only available for a short time each year!

Making canned boiled peanuts at harvest time is the simple solution to enjoying this salty snack all year long!

If your craving can’t wait, make Instant Pot Boiled Peanuts. This is by far the fastest way to boil peanuts. * Note: An Instant Pot is a pressure cooker, not a pressure canner. To pressure can boiled peanuts, follow the recipe below.

If you want a set-it-and-forget-it way to cook your boiled peanuts, then use my Easy Crockpot Boiled Peanuts Recipe to make peanuts in your slow cooker. If you have leftovers, get all the tips for Freezing Boiled Peanuts and how- to reheat them as well.

Why You Will Love This Recipe

  • Boiled peanuts are so much fun to eat and make the most delicious snack!
  • The salty brine they are cooked in makes them perfect for snacking.
  • Canning boiled peanuts means you can store them and enjoy them throughout the entire year.

What Is the best variety of peanuts for boiling?

David West from the Georgia Peanut Commission shares that while there are several varieties of peanuts grown in the US, the two that are used frequently for boiling are the Valencia and Runner varieties. While Valencia is considered the gourmet variety for sweetness, the Runner is far better for boiling, especially when available green, straight from the field!

Ingredients for Southern Boiled Peanuts

The ingredients are pretty close to the same as the other cooking methods, but with one small change! Here’s what you need:

Raw peanuts in a big bag, salt and tony chachere's seasoning mix.
  • Green peanuts in the shell: Allow about one pound of peanuts per quart jar you wan to can.
  • Salt: Use any salt that’s good for pickling or canning. I use Mortons Iodized Salt.
  • Cajun seasoning: An optional ingredient here! But if you like them spicy then I highly recommend Tony Chachere’s Brand!

What kind of peanuts do you boil?

When using fresh green peanuts vs. raw peanuts to make boiled peanuts, there are some differences in the process:

Fresh Green Peanuts for Boiled Peanuts:

  • Fresh green peanuts are preferred for making traditional boiled peanuts because of their higher moisture content and tenderness.
  • They require a shorter cooking time compared to raw peanuts. You can start with about 1 to 1.5 hours of boiling.
  • Seasonings and flavors can penetrate fresh green peanuts more easily due to their higher water content, resulting in a softer, more succulent texture.
  • Fresh green peanuts may become fully cooked and tender faster, so it’s essential to taste them periodically to ensure they reach your desired level of doneness.

Raw Peanuts for Boiled Peanuts:

  • If you decide to use raw peanuts, you’ll need to extend the cooking time significantly because they have lower moisture content and are less tender than fresh green peanuts.
  • Boiling raw peanuts can take anywhere from 4 to 8 hours or even more, depending on the size and maturity of the peanuts. It’s a slow-cooking process.
  • Due to their lower moisture content, raw peanuts may not absorb flavors and seasonings as readily as fresh green peanuts, so you might want to use more seasonings and allow them to cook longer for better flavor infusion.
  • Raw peanuts will become tender with prolonged cooking, and you’ll need to monitor them closely to ensure they reach the desired softness.

Where can I buy green peanuts?

If you live in a warm-weather climate, then peanuts are harvested at the end of the summer. Check your local farmers markets during peanut season to see if they’re available.

If it’s off-season or you live where they don’t grow you can get them on Amazon. One two-pound bag would be perfect for Instapot Boiled Peanuts or Crockpot Boiled Peanuts.

Canning Resources

If this is your first time canning, don’t worry because I have lots of resources to help you get started.

The first place to start is with my Canning Supplies Guide so you can gather up all the tools you need to start. For beginners, I highly recommend my Canning 101 and basic canning terms posts to get started. You will find many helpful tips and ideas.

If you still feel a bit uneasy about getting started, I’ve put together a list of my favorite canning books! Take a look and maybe order one!

boiled peanuts in shell

How to Can Boiled Peanuts

Once you’ve got your ingredients gathered and you’re ready to get started here’s a highlight of all the main steps for canning peanuts.

Step 1: Prep the Peanuts

Step 1: Wash the peanuts and then soak the peanuts in the shell in fresh water for one hour.

Step 2: Discard the water, cover again with fresh cold water and soak for another hour. Then repeat again!

PRO TIP: The soaking process is crucial! Green or raw peanuts in the shell are soaked for a total of three hours with fresh water each time!

Step 2: Sterilize the Equipment

Step 3: Sterilize the canning jars in boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove them and drain all the water.

Step 4: Sterilize the lids in a small pot of almost boiling water for 5 minutes. Use the magnetic lid lifter wand to pull them out.

Step 3: Make Brine

Step 5: Combine one cup of salt with one gallon of water and heat on low heat. Keep it low so the water doesn’t boil off and keep heated until you are ready to fill the jars

Step 4: Boil the Peanuts

Step 6: Heat water in a large pot until it boils. Add the peanuts and cook the peanuts at a simmer, just below the boiling, for ten minutes. 

PRO TIP: Make sure your pot is large enough to hold all the peanuts you plan on canning and room for extra water

Step 5: Add Peanuts to Jars

Step 7: Pack the hot peanuts into the sterilized jars. Be sure to leave a ½ inch headspace in each jar.

Step 8: Fill each jar with the boiling brine leaving a ½ inch space at the top. Remove any air bubbles.

Pro Tip: How To Release Bubbles From Jars When Canning:

  1. After filling your canning jars with the desired food product and leaving the appropriate headspace, use a non-metallic utensil such as a plastic spatula or canning bubble remover tool. You can also use a plastic knife or a chopstick.
  2. Gently insert the utensil into the jar, moving it up and down around the edges of the jar. This helps to dislodge any trapped air bubbles.
  3. Repeat this process throughout the jar, ensuring you cover all areas, especially along the sides of the jar and around the food.
  4. As you stir or move the utensil, you may notice air bubbles rising to the surface. Continue until you don’t see any more bubbles.
  5. Failure to work out air bubbles from jars before processing will cause liquid to leak from jars, so do not skip this step.

Step 9: Add your cajun seasoning if you’re using it. 

Step 10: Wipe the rims of the jars and then add lids and rings. Tighten each snugly. 

Step 6: Pressure Cook the Peanuts

Step 11: Place the jars into the weighted gauge pressure canner with 4 inches of water in the bottom.

PRO TIP: Please follow your own canner’s instruction book on how to use a canner.

Step 12: Lock the lid on your pressure canner and heat on high. Allow the steam to escape through the vent for ten minutes to purge the airspace inside the canner

Step 13: After cooking for ten minutes, add the weight and close any openings to allow the pressure to build to 10 pounds.

Step 14: Once the gauge hits 10 pounds be sure to set your timer for 90 minutes. During this time, be sure to watch the heat to keep it at 10 pounds of pressure.

Step 15: When the processing time is over, turn off the heat, and allow the pressure canner to cool and the pressure to drop to zero before opening the canner lid.

Step 16: Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool on a towel without touching or bumping them.

EQUIPMENT TIP: When canning, I use an All American 21 1/2 quart canner. I can get 7 quarts or 19 pints processed at one time. Using a canner can make a person a little nervous, but I have found with this All American I feel completely comfortable and always have great success with the end product.

How to Store Canned Boiled Peanuts Properly

With a few simple safety steps, you can enjoy your home-canned goods for an extended period while ensuring their safety and quality.

  1. Cool and inspect: After the jars have undergone the canning process and cooled completely, remove the bands or rings and check for proper sealing. Press down on the center of the lids to ensure they are concave and do not flex or move. If a lid doesn’t seal properly, either reprocess the jar using a new lid or refrigerate and consume the contents within a few days.
  2. Clean and label: Wipe the jars clean to remove any residue or stickiness. Label the jars with the contents and the date of canning. This helps you keep track of the age of your canned goods and ensures you use the oldest ones first.
  3. Store in a cool, dark place: Find a cool, dark, and dry location for storing your home-canned jars. Ideally, the temperature should be between 50°F and 70°F (10°C to 21°C). Avoid areas with excessive heat or temperature fluctuations, such as near ovens, stoves, or direct sunlight.
  4. Avoid dampness: Moisture can damage the seals and lead to spoilage. Ensure the storage area is free from excessive humidity or dampness, as it can cause mold growth and compromise the quality of your canned goods.
  5. Arrange jars properly: Place the jars upright and avoid stacking them directly on top of each other. This helps prevent unnecessary pressure on the lids and reduces the risk of breakage. Use sturdy shelves or racks to organize your jars efficiently.
  6. Rotate and use within recommended timeframes: While home-canned goods can be safely stored for a long time, it’s generally recommended to use them within a year for optimal quality. However, the specific shelf life can vary depending on the food item and the canning method used. Check reputable canning resources or consult the National Center for Home Food Preservation for detailed guidelines on specific foods.

How to Serve Canned Boiled Peanuts

Serve up canned boiled peanuts the southern way. Take off the canning seal, warm the softened peanuts up in the microwave for a minute, then scoop them out of the juice into a paper bag.

You can also use boiled peanuts to make Boiled Peanut Hummus! It’s a tasty variation on the classic recipe.

boiled peanuts in a brown bag

Expert Tips

  • You must use a pressure canner because peanuts are low-acid foods.
  • Plan on about one pound of green or raw peanuts in the shell per quart jar.
  • Do not use roasted, already cooked, or dried peanuts. Fully mature peanuts do not make good-quality boiled peanuts. Use raw nuts for boiling peanuts.
  • The total soaking time for canning boiled peanuts is three hours! ]
  • It’s important to make boiled peanuts with salty water! The water needs to be salty enough to penetrate the shells in order to make the most flavorful peanuts.

What do boiled peanuts taste like?

Boiled peanuts are definitely an acquired taste, but southerners take their traditional snack seriously.

They have a smooth, creamy flavor similar to chickpeas. Some like their boiled peanuts mild and salty, while others like their spicy cajun boiled. When you crack open the shell and pop out the peanuts, they are a bit slimy in texture and very soft.

Be sure and have a napkin nearby because the peanut juice tends to run down your arms to your elbows.

Do you eat them hot or cold?

Boiled peanuts are traditionally served warm in a paper bag. However, some people like them cold, right out of the fridge.

If you like them warm, pour them in a pan and warm them up on the stovetop over medium heat. Another way is to place the peanuts in a microwave-safe boil and warm them that way.

Do you eat the shell on boiled peanuts?

Boiled peanut shells are slightly soft because of the long boiling process. A hardcore southerner might say you should eat the shell however, most people discard them after picking out the peanuts.

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boiled peanuts in juice
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Canned Boiled Peanuts: Step-By-Step Guide

Prep Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 5 hours
Servings: 6 quarts
Canned boiled peanuts are a salty southern treat that are easy to can. If you are from the south you know that summer brings boiled peanut stands, selling warm salty goodness in a paper bag. Canning your own at home is easy and makes for a great snack all year long.

Note: Be sure to read through the recipe’s post for tips and details about this recipe.

hand showing you to tap on the ingredient to add to your walmart and target list.

Ingredients
 

  • 6 pounds peanuts, Fresh green peanuts in the shell – 1 pound per quart jar you want to can
  • 1 pound salt , pickling or canning
  • 6 teaspoons cajun seasoning, optional – 1 teaspon per quart jar
  • water

Instructions
 

Prep Peanuts

  • Wash and select fully mature, but still green peanuts. They must not be roasted or already cooked or dried. Fully mature peanuts do not make good quality boiled peanuts; rather raw or “green” ones are used.
    6 pounds peanuts
  • Soak the peanuts in the shell in fresh water for one hour.
    6 pounds peanuts
  • Discard the water, cover again with fresh water and soak for another hour.
  • Repeat this soaking process one more time for another hour. This makes a total soaking time of three hours, using fresh water each time.

Sterilize Equipment

  • Put the canning jars in boiling water for 10 minutes to sterilize. Remove and drain.
  • Put lids in a small pot of almost boiling water for 5 minutes, then use the magnetic lid lifter wand to pull them out.

Make Brine

  • Combine 1 cup of pickling salt or kosher salt with 1 gallon of water. Set this on a burner on low heat (so it does not boil away) until you are ready to fill the jars
    1 pound salt

Parboil Peanuts

  • Get a very large pot of boiling water going, enough to hold all the peanuts you plan on canning and room for extra water. Then parboil (simmer just below the boiling point) the peanuts for 10 minutes in fresh water and drain.

Fill Jars

  • Pack the hot peanuts into hot jars, leaving ½ inch head space
    6 pounds peanuts
  • Fill each jar to ½ inch from the top with boiling brine (1 cup salt per gallon of water). Remove any air bubbles.
  • Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon of cajun seasoning, depending on how spicy you like it. (optional)
    6 teaspoons cajun seasoning
  • Wipe the jar's rims, put the lids on then the rings and tighten them snugly. Place the jars into the weighted gauge pressure canner with 4 inches of water in the bottom. Please follow your own canner's instruction book on how to use a canner.

Pressue Cook

  • Lock lid on pressure canner, put the heat on high and let the steam escape through the vent for 10 minutes to purge the airspace inside the canner
  • After 10 minutes of venting, put the weight on and close any openings to allow the pressure to build to 11 pounds
  • Once the gauge hits 10 pounds, set your timer for 90 minutes, controlling heat to keep at 10 pounds pressure.
  • When processing time is over, turn off the heat, and allow the pressure canner to cool and the pressure to drop to zero before opening the canner lid
  • Lift the jars out of the water and let them cool on a towel, without touching or bumping them.

Notes

Cooking Time Note
  • Fresh Green Peanuts are just picked peanuts. It’s best to store them in a cool, dry place like a refrigerator until you are ready to cook them. If you use these to can with you can cut your canning time down to 60 minutes in the pressure cooker.
  • Raw Peanuts are raw but dried, so they are safe to sit out for a week or two at room temperature. These peanuts take a little longer to cook, so be sure and process them 90 minutes in the pressure canner.
Safe Canning Practices and Tips
  • You must use a pressure canner because peanuts are low-acid foods. 
  • Do not use roasted, already cooked, or dried peanuts. Fully mature peanuts do not make good-quality boiled peanuts. Use raw nuts for boiling peanuts.
  • It’s important to make boiled peanuts with salty water! The water needs to be salty enough to penetrate the shells in order to make the most flavorful peanuts.
Serving: 1cup, Calories: 648kcal, Carbohydrates: 18g, Protein: 30g, Fat: 56g, Saturated Fat: 9g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 20g, Monounsaturated Fat: 25g, Sodium: 7350mg, Potassium: 857mg, Fiber: 11g, Sugar: 0.1g, Vitamin A: 246IU, Vitamin C: 0.005mg, Calcium: 126mg, Iron: 5mg
Cuisine: American
Course: Canning
Author: Gina Dickson

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