Canning chickpeas is a great way to save money and the flavor is better than store-bought cans. Keeping your pantry stocked with canned chickpeas is the basis for quick and easy meals or snacks. You can easily add them to soups, casseroles, and salads. Chickpeas are also the base for many hummus recipes.

Pint jars of chickpeas that have been pressure canned

What are chickpeas?

Chickpeas are a legume that is a staple in many cultures throughout history. The “peas” themselves are actually seeds encased in small pods that grow on the plant. 

Save This Recipe Form

Send This Recipe To Your Inbox

Enter your email and I'll send it directly to you! Plus, enjoy new recipes, entertaining tips, and a free surprise bonus!

Are chickpeas different than garbanzo beans?

No, chickpeas and garbanzo beans are the same types of seed. The term “garbanzo” came from the Spanish-speaking bean eaters, who added the bean to their soups and stews. It’s thought that we got the name garbanzo from the Spanish word “garbantzu” which literally translates to dry seed.

The name chickpea is thought to come from the French words “chiche pease.” It seemed to get translated in English to chickpeas loosely. Of course, I like to think a bowl of chickpeas resembles little fluffy chicks, but who really knows.

Two images one of chickpeas and one of a bunch of chicks that are a day old clumped together showing how much they look alike

Do you have to boil canned chickpeas?

No, you can enjoy chickpeas right out of the can. You can also place them directly into a recipe and heat them.

What can you make with chickpeas?

My favorite way to eat chickpeas is to make hummus. My best hummus recipe is an easy homemade garlic recipe that is delicious.

If you like hummus, you might also like to try some of these 50 delicious and unique hummus recipes—fun ingredients such as beetroot, carrot, avocado, and various veggies, beans, and spices.

If soup is your jam then try hearty vegetable chowder with chickpeas.

Canning chickpeas safely

All beans are low acid foods (pH above 4.6) that provide a good environment for the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the bacterial cause of botulism. For safety, beans must be pressure canned by a scientifically tested process.

Learn How to Pressure Can Chickpeas

If you are new to canning, then be sure and read through HOW TO START CANNING AT HOME. Learning the basic steps of canning for beginners is a fun and economical way to make great tasting fresh foods available to enjoy year-round. Also, be sure and read my Canning Supplies Guide. There are many helpful tips and ideas.

If you are new to pressure canning or want to get more confident using your pressure canner, please visit my post Learn How To Pressure Can.

Pressure canning at home is easy and safe if you take the time to learn proper procedures. Start by becoming familiar with A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO CANNING TERMS.

 How many pounds of chickpeas per pressure pot?

Chickpeas vary in size, so the outcome is different depending on the size. I generally found one pound of dried chickpeas equals 2 canned pints.

Varieties

There are a variety of chickpeas that are grown. I like to can all of these. There really is not much difference in taste, but it’s nice to have the different colors in a recipe.

Instructions

  1. Overnight method: Place dried chickpeas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak for 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Quick method: To quickly hydrate chickpeas, you may cover sorted and washed chickpeas with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak for 1 hour and drain.
  2. Drain water.
  3. Cover chickpeas soaked by either method with fresh water and boil for 30 minutes.
  4. Add ½ teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon per quart to the jar, if desired.
  5. Fill jars with chickpeas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch headspace.
  6. Place lids on jars and screw ring on finger tight.
  7. Process for pints for 75 minutes and quarts for 90 minutes.
A glass bowl of chickpeas soaking in water

Tips

  • Don’t skip rehydrating dried chickpeas. This will help keep them from expanding too much in the canning jars. If they are not rehydrated, they absorb all the liquid leaving them in a dry jar. This will yield a dry, tough chickpea.
  • Be sure to strain out the soaking water. This will remove the starches they’ve released during soaking and result in higher quality home-canned beans.
  • Follow instructions carefully and do not change the processing time to assure you have a safe and delicious product.

How long are they good?

If you have followed all the safe canning procedures and keep your canned chickpeas in a dry, cool area, they will stay at peak flavor for up to a year.

Seasoning variation

I like to add some seasoning before I can my chickpeas. First, I simmer my chickpeas in chicken broth instead of water. When done cooking for 30 minutes, I ladle them into jars with the broth they were cooked in. Then I add a sprig of rosemary, one small bay leaf, and one small whole clove of garlic to each jar.

Canned chickpeas in mason jars

More canning recipe ideas

  • Canning Lima Beans fresh or dried is the basis for a quick, and tasty meal that will lower your grocery budget. They are great for a quick side dish, added into casseroles or soups.
  • Canning Beans fresh or dried is the basis for a nutritious, quick, and tasty meal that will lower your grocery budget.
  • Pressure Canning Potatoes is easy and yields delicious cooked potatoes ready to use for quick meals, soups, or stews on busy nights and is a great way to keep your food budget low.
  • Canned Cowboy Candy is the perfect way to preserve a bunch of jalapenos in an addictive sweet and spicy sauce. Perfect on burgers, Mexican foods, in dips, and pimento cheese spread.
  • This Brandy Spiced Pear Compote recipe has a combination of pears and brandy simmered together in spices such as cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg creating an elegant and delicious compote. 
Pint jars of chickpeas that have been pressure canned
5 from 3 ratings

Canning Chickpeas

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 35 minutes
Servings: 2 pints
Canning chickpeas is a great way to save money and the flavor is better than store-bought cans. Keeping your pantry stocked with canned chickpeas is the basis for quick and easy meals or snacks.

Note: Be sure to read through the recipe’s post for tips and details about this recipe.

Ingredients
 

Instructions
 

Rehydrating Dried Chickpeas

  • Overnight method: Place dried chickpeas in a large pot and cover with water. Soak for 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Quick method: To quickly hydrate chickpeas, you may cover sorted and washed chickpeas with boiling water in a saucepan. Boil 2 minutes, remove from heat, soak for 1 hour and drain.
  • Drain water.

Canning Dried Chickpeas

  • Cover chickpeas soaked by either method with fresh water and boil for 30 minutes.
  • Add ½ teaspoon of salt per pint or 1 teaspoon per quart to the jar, if desired.
  • Fill jars with chickpeas and cooking water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Run your bubble popper through the jar to remove air bubbles and wipe the rims.
  • Place lids on jars and screw ring on finger tight.
  • Place the jars carefully into the pressure canner on the canning rack. Leave space in between the jars. Once the jars are all in the canner, adjust the hot water level per your pressure canner’s instructions. If adding water, be sure it is hot water.
  • Process pint jars of chickpeas at 10 pounds of pressure 75 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Process quart jars of chickpeas at 10 pounds of pressure 90 minutes at altitudes of less than 1,000 ft. Follow the directions for your pressure canner and adjust processing time for your altitude.
  • When the processing time is done, turn off heat; cool canner to zero pressure. After 5 minutes, remove the lid. Let jars cool 10 minutes. Remove jars from canner and place on a towel. Do not retighten bands if loose. Cool for 24 hours. Check seals. Remove rings, wipe jars, write date on lids, and store in a cool dark, and dry pantry.
Serving: 0.25pint, Calories: 372kcal, Carbohydrates: 62g, Protein: 20g, Fat: 6g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 1179mg, Potassium: 660mg, Fiber: 17g, Sugar: 11g, Vitamin A: 61IU, Vitamin C: 3mg, Calcium: 112mg, Iron: 7mg
Cuisine: American
Course: Canning
Author: Gina Dickson

⭐️ One last thing, please leave a rating and comment letting me know how you liked making this recipe. This helps me provide more free, high-quality recipes for everyone.

Did you make this recipe?Show it off! Share on Instagram, tag @intentionalhospitality. Are you a food enthusiast who enjoys trying new recipes and sharing your thoughts about them? I would love to have you join our VIP Recipe Testers Group. Learn More !